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Posts Tagged ‘2016

NUBIAN SQUARE not Dudley. The rename petition. An idea whose time has come.

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Black Community Information Center logo

August 20, 2016

Re: A Petition To Change The Name Of Dudley Square To “NUBIAN SQUARE”

Boston is often promoted as having a small abolition community during slavery. However, what is not widely known is the fact that slavery was heavily practiced here in this city at that time. This resulted in the naming of numerous streets in honor of notorious slave owners. Examples of this are Warren Street, Dudley Street, Codman Square, etc. In the last couple of decades, the Black Community Information Center Inc. has taken a leading role in combatting this hypocrisy by having the former Washington Park and New Dudley Street renamed “Malcolm X Park” and “Malcolm X Boulevard” respectively. However, that is only the tip of the iceberg as many contradictory symbols remain in the Afrikan/Black community in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. A clear example would be Dudley Square in Roxbury, which is named after a family of major slave owners.

Our goal is to have Dudley Station renamed “NUBIAN STATION,” a name that would reflect the culture and heritage (Afrikan/Black) of the people who live in the surrounding community. We will officially launch the name change petition at the tribute for A Nubian Notion on Sunday, August 21, 2016 from 2:00 PM until 8:00 PM at Hibernian Hall in Roxbury, Mass.

We are calling on our community to be soldiers and collect the necessary petition signatures. Petition forms will be available for signing at the tribute and there will be copies of the petition available to those who wish to help us collect signatures in the community. If you are unable to attend the tribute on Sunday, you can pick up a copy of the petition at A Nubian Notion, Inc. at 41 Warren Street or at the NAACP/Boston office located in the Washington Park Mall at 330 Martin Luther King Boulevard. (You may also click here to view and print copies of the petition). The deadline for petition signature collection and submission is Friday, September 2, 2016 at 12:00 noon.

Full community participation in this important effort is urged.

For further information, call 617-427-2522 or go to www.blackinfonow.org.

Sadiki Kambon, Director
Black Community Information Center, Inc.

Written by aboutblackboston

August 23, 2016 at 1:42 pm

The sneaker movie KICKS screens at AMC Boston Common Sept 15 #free

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The Hiphop Archive and Research Institute will be hosting the Boston advance screening of feature film KICKS at AMC Boston Common 19 on Thursday, September 15

HipHopArchive.org at Harvard ( watch movie trailer at HHA).

 KICKS Recently premiered at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. KICKS is the directorial debut for Oakland native Justin Tipping and the semi-autobiographical story of a young man hunting for his “kicks.”

Fifteen-year-old Brandon, played by up-and-coming breakout star Jahking Guillory, longs for a pair of the freshest sneakers that money can buy; assuming that merely having them on his feet will help him escape the reality of being poor, neglected by the opposite sex and picked on by everyone — even his best friends. 

FREE KICKS TICKET RESERVATION LINK / Boston movie house.

Free AboutBlackBoston ticket signup link / and casting call benefits.

Working hard to get them, he soon finds that the titular shoes have instead made him a target after they are promptly snatched by local hood, Flaco (Kofi Siriboe). Seemingly the embodiment of menace, Flaco harbors complexities of his own that will be revealed when Brandon goes on a mission to retrieve his stolen sneakers with his two best friends in tow.

Boasting a strong ensemble cast, and featuring a memorable lead performance, the film transcends a deceptively traditional hero’s journey to deliver a “… 21st century tale about inner city masculinity and the feelings of isolation and loneliness that often plague us during adolescence. 

It’s a film about manhood and the cycles that continue to spiral through generations, flattening many Black men while others barely escape the carnage,” (Aramide A. Tinubu, IndieWire). Sam Eifling of Sole Collector explains, “the kids are relatable, the score is moody and dreamy; the soundtrack is a playground of hip-hop. 

And its world feels authentic in a way that most features don’t, in part because it grew out of a real milieu.”

Visually and thematically rich, with an amazing soundtrack of both hip-hop classics and Bay Area favorites, KICKS creates an original, true-to-life portrait of a young man drowning in the expectations of machismo.
 

Written by aboutblackboston

August 18, 2016 at 9:39 am

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Callie Crossley wins big at National Association of Black Journalists 2016 Conference

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

From WGBH Media Contact: Ellen London

WGBH News’ Callie Crossley Wins Top Honors from NABJ for Race Commentary

BOSTON, August 16, 2016 — WGBH News award-winning journalist, Callie Crossley, was recognized with top honors in the Commentary category at the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Conference, held August 3-7 in Washington, D.C. Crossley, host of WGBH News’ Under the Radar, won first place for Top 15 Markets for her three-part compilation of commentaries, “Race Matters: Echoing History,” which explores current racial issues in the United States through the lens of the country’s civil rights history.

Nabj logo

“We are proud of Callie and have long believed that her observations are the best offered by local radio,” said Phil Redo, WGBH General Manager for Radio. “Callie’s examination of race and media coverage has come at a critical moment in the current political climate, and her unwavering commitment to telling the stories that are often overlooked is what makes her so original and so compelling.”

A former producer for ABC News’ 20/20, Crossley is also a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow through the Council of Independent Colleges, guest-lecturing at colleges and universities about media, politics and the intersection of race, gender and media. She also holds two fellowships at Harvard University. Crossley was a producer for Blackside Inc.’s Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, which earned her an Oscar nomination, a National Emmy Award and the Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Award. Crossley has earned the Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Clarion Awards for writing, producing and hosting.

In addition to hosting Under the Radar, which features stories not usually covered by traditional media outlets, Crossley appears weekly on WGBH’s Beat the Press, examining local and national media coverage, and Basic Black, focusing on current events concerning communities of color. She also contributes to national programs including CNN’s Reliable Sources, PBS’s NewsHour and PRI’s The Takeaway.

Under the Radar airs Sundays from 6 to 7 p.m. EDT on 89.7 WGBH. Crossley’s weekly commentaries air Mondays during WGBH’s Morning Edition.

Race Matters: Echoing History
Part 1: “The Blood, Sweat, and Tears Shed at Selma, Alabama”
Part 2: “Do You Know Any Looters with Hope?”
Part 3: “Tomorrow is Not Promised: Life After Hurricane Katrina”

About WGBH News
WGBH News is among the fastest growing local news providers in greater Boston and draws on the talent of a multi-platform newsroom that includes 89.7 WGBH, Boston’s Local NPR, television and digital reporting. The WGBH newsroom continues to invest in substantive local coverage and has established dedicated desks for innovation, higher education and politics as well as unique partnerships to expand on that commitment, including with WNYC’s The Takeaway, PRI’s The World, the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and The GroundTruth Project.

Written by aboutblackboston

August 16, 2016 at 12:58 pm

Posted in Fresh Spots

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Lawyer’s Committee Tells Boston Mayor his Police Force Is 65% Too White

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“Race in Boston” Town Hall

lawyerscom300w
July 19, 2016

In a letter sent today, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice called on Mayor Martin Walsh to take proactive steps to diversify the Boston Police Department (BPD) and to implement meaningful implicit bias training for all officers.

Recent polls confirm that tension and distrust exist between law enforcement and communities of color in Boston. A fundamental problem is the lack of diversity in BPD. Simply put, Boston is becoming increasingly diverse, but BPD is not.

Drawing on data that we secured through a public records lawsuit we recently filed against BPD, our letter shows that while Boston has become a majority-minority city, the police force is still approximately 65% White. The lack of diversity in BPD’s supervisory ranks is even more stark: less than one-fifth of supervisory officers are Black, Latino, or Asian.

With each passing year, BPD is looking less and less like the community that it serves. In the face of these numbers, city officials profess that their hands are tied. Last week, at a town hall on race, Boston’s Chief of Economic Development defended BPD arguing that the City could not do more because of vague and unspecified “barriers.”

In our letter, we set the record straight: some of the greatest barriers are created directly by the City. In fact, the City and BPD are aggressively fighting efforts to diversify the police force.

We call on Mayor Walsh to take proactive steps to improve diversity in BPD.

We also call on BPD to conduct ongoing implicit bias training for its officers.

Boston is just one incident away from becoming another Ferguson or Baton Rouge. We can avoid this if the City and BPD work closely with communities of color.

Our letter to Mayor Walsh is available here: http://lawyerscom.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Walsh-Letter-re-BPD-Final.pdf

Donate Now and Help Us Create A World Full of Justice and Equality

Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice
294 Washington St. Suite #443
Boston, MA 02108

Written by aboutblackboston

July 19, 2016 at 5:32 pm

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Did Renee Loth read every word of the Massachusetts initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol?

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Just read her op-ed in her paper, the Boston Globe. She says do not legalize marijuana for retail to persons over 21 in the state of Massachusetts.

She’s okay with medical marijuana, but she thinks the state can’t handle forming a Cannabis Commission that will license 75 marijuana retail stores and their supply chain.

Renee Loth does important work at the Boston Globe.

I’m not sure of her title today but it was not so long ago when she sat t the paper with a very small group during election cycles and made all the political endorsement decisions –  telling you who to vote for and insuring that her pick was front page Boston Globe masthead news.

I won’t bother to cite the Globe sheet link to her article  because you’re going to hear very loud versions of Renee’s  Just say No campaign from the governor and mayor of Massachusetts and Boston.

If passed, the new law will allow an individual to grow a few plants at home for personal use and it will limit their legal possession to one ounce of marijuana.

Regulating marijuana prints money for the state and provides consumers with a catalog of product  choices.

Read the ballot question text they don’t want you to approve.

Source: https://www.regulatemassachusetts.org/news

It only seems fair to lift the prohibition on marijuana because it was lifted for alcohol.

Written by aboutblackboston

April 25, 2016 at 10:11 am

Google offers non-profits up to $25,000 for working with girls and minorities.

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Google Grants

The Google RISE Awards is an annual grants program for nonprofit organizations worldwide that promote computer science education opportunities. These efforts reach K-12/pre-university students, with an emphasis on girls and minorities who have historically been underrepresented in the field.

Visit the Guidelines page to learn more about what the RISE Awards offer and who is eligible to apply.

https://www.google.com/edu/resources/programs/google-rise-awards/index.html#!guidelines

 


 

Massachusetts WorkForce Grants
Get up to $50,000  the  the purchase and installation of equipment to support vocational and technical training that results in attainment of superior skills for those preparing to enter the workforce.

Think software coding, technical nursing and the biomedical sciences,  manufacturing assembly, robotics, pharmaceutical lab work and things along those lines.,..

Written by aboutblackboston

January 9, 2016 at 2:21 pm

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